Taxpayers can take steps now to Get Ready to file their taxes in 2020

There are steps people can take now to make sure their tax filing experience goes smoothly next year. First, they can visit the Get Ready page on IRS.gov to find out more.

Here are a few other things people can do now:

Check their withholding and make any adjustments soon
Since most employees typically only have a few pay dates left this year, checking their withholding soon is especially important. It’s even more important for those who:

  • Received a smaller refund than expected after filing their 2018 taxes this year.
  • Owed an unexpected tax bill last year.
  • Experienced personal or financial changes that might change their tax liability.

Some people may owe an unexpected tax bill when they file their 2019 tax return next year. To avoid this kind of surprise, taxpayers should use the Tax Withholding Estimator to perform a quick paycheck or pension income checkup. Doing so helps them decide if they need to adjust their withholding or make estimated or additional tax payments now. 

Gather documents
Everyone should come up with a recordkeeping system. Whether it’s electronic or paper, they should use a system to keep all important information in one place. Having all needed documents on hand before they prepare their return helps them file a complete and accurate tax return. This includes:

  • Their 2018 tax return.
  • Forms W-2 from employers.
  • Forms 1099 from banks and other payers.
  • Forms 1095-A from the marketplace for those claiming the premium tax credit.

Confirm mailing and email addresses
To make sure these forms make it to the taxpayer on time, people should confirm now that each employer, bank and other payer has the taxpayer’s current mailing address or email address. Typically, forms start arriving by mail or are available online in January.

People should keep copies of tax returns and all supporting documents for at least three years. Also, taxpayers using a software product for the first time may need the adjusted gross income amount from their 2018 return to validate their electronically filed 2019 return.

File electronically and choose direct deposit for a faster refund
Errors delay refunds. The easiest way to avoid them is to file electronically. Using tax preparation software is the best and simplest way to file a complete and accurate tax return. Tax prep software guides taxpayers through the process and does all the math. In fact, taxpayers can start looking into their filing options now.

Another way to speed thing up is to use direct deposit. Combining direct deposit with electronic filing is the fastest way to get a refund. With direct deposit, a refund goes directly into a taxpayer’s bank account. They don’t need to worry about a lost, stolen or undeliverable refund check.

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#401(k) #contribution #limit increases to #$19,500 for #2020; #catch-up limit rises to $6,500

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced that employees in 401(k) plans will be able to contribute up to $19,500 next year.

The IRS announced this and other changes in Notice 2019-59, posted today on IRS.gov. This guidance provides cost of living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for tax year 2020.

Highlights of changes for 2020

The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $19,000 to $19,500.

The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in these plans is increased from $6,000 to $6,500.

The limitation regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts for 2020 is increased to $13,500, up from $13,000 for 2019.

The income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the Saver’s Credit all increased for 2020.

Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or his or her spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. (If neither the taxpayer nor his or her spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.) Here are the phase-out ranges for 2020:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $65,000 to $75,000, up from $64,000 to $74,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $104,000 to $124,000, up from $103,000 to $123,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $196,000 and $206,000, up from $193,000 and $203,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $124,000 to $139,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $122,000 to $137,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $196,000 to $206,000, up from $193,000 to $203,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $65,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $64,000; $48,750 for heads of household, up from $48,000; and $32,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $32,000.

Key limit remains unchanged

The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $6,000. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.

Details on these and other retirement-related cost-of-living adjustments for 2020 are in Notice 2019-59, available on IRS.gov.

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Here’s basic info for #businesses #filing #excise_taxes

Businesses providing goods and services that are subject to excise tax must file a Form 720 quarterly to report the tax to the IRS.

What is excise tax?
Excise taxes are charged on a wide variety of goods, services and activities. The tax may be imposed at the time of:

  • Import
  • Sale by the manufacturer
  • Sale by the retailer
  • Use by the consumer

Many excise taxes go into trust funds earmarked for related capital projects, such as highway and airport improvements. Excise taxes are independent of income taxes. People pay excise taxes on things like gasoline, indoor tanning, airline tickets and tires.

Since the excise cost is usually included in the price, the seller or manufacturer is responsible for sending these tax payments to the IRS and filing Form 720.

When to file?
Businesses must file the form for each quarter of the calendar year. Here are the due dates:

  • Quarter 1 – January, February, March: Deadline = April 30
  • Quarter 2 – April, May, June: Deadline = July 31
  • Quarter 3 – July, August, September: Deadline = October 31
  • Quarter 4 – October, November, December: Deadline = January 31

If the due date for filing a return falls on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, the due date is the next business day.

How to file?
While the IRS still accepts paper Forms 720, they encourage businesses to file electronically. To help excise taxpayers do this, the IRS posts the contact information on IRS.gov of all approved e-file transmitters for excise forms. Businesses can submit forms online 24 hours a day.

That said, not all excise forms can be filed electronically. Those that are available for electronic filing are:

  • Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax.
  • Form 2290, Heavy Highway Vehicle Use Tax.
  • Form 8849, Claim for Refund of Excise Taxes, Schedules 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8.

When businesses file Form 720 electronically, they not only get confirmation the IRS received the form, but it reduces processing time and errors. To electronically file Form 720, business taxpayers will have to pay the provider’s fee for online submission.

More information:
Form 720 e-file providers page
2290 Modernized e-file Providers
8849 Modernized e-file Providers
Excise Tax Forms and Publication

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#Tax treatment for #family_members_working in the #family_business

One of the advantages of someone running their own business is hiring family members. But when including family members in business operations, certain tax treatments and employment tax rules apply. Here are some facts to know when working with a spouse, parent or child.

Both spouses carrying on the trade or business

If spouses carry on a business together and share in the profits and losses, they may be partners whether or not they have a formal partnership agreement. If so, they should report income or loss from the business on Form 1065. They should not report the income on a Schedule C (Form 1040) in the name of one spouse as a sole proprietor. But, the spouses can elect not to treat the joint venture as a partnership by making a qualified joint venture election. 

Qualified joint venture

Spouses may elect treatment as a qualified joint venture instead of a partnership. A qualified joint venture conducts a trade or business where:

  • The only members are a married couple who file a joint return,
  • Both spouses materially participate in the trade or business, and
  • Both spouses elect not to be treated as a partnership.

Only businesses owned and operated by spouses as co-owners and not in the name of a state law entity, such as a limited partnership or limited liability company, are eligible for the qualified joint venture election. Find more information on joint ventures in Publication 541, Partnerships.

Spouses electing qualified joint venture status are sole proprietors for federal tax purposes. Each spouse must file a separate Schedule C to report their share of profits and losses. They don’t need an EIN unless their sole proprietorship must file excise, employment, alcohol, tobacco or firearms returns. One spouse cannot continue to use the partnership’s Employer Identification Number (EIN) for the qualified joint venture. The EIN must stay with the partnership; it’s used by the partnership for any year in which the business doesn’t meet qualified joint venture requirements.

Employment taxes

If the business has employees, either of the spouses as sole proprietors may report and pay the employment taxes. The spouse, as an employer, must have an EIN for their sole proprietorship. If the business filed or paid employment taxes for part of the year under the partnership’s EIN, the spouse may be considered the employee’s “successor employer” for purposes of figuring whether wages reached the Social Security and federal unemployment wage base limits.
 
One spouse employed by another. The wages for the services of an individual who works for their spouse are subject to income tax withholding and Social Security and Medicare taxes but not to the Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA).

Child employed by parents. Payments for the services of a child under age 18 aren’t subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes, if the business is a sole proprietorship or a partnership in which each partner is a parent of the child. Payments to a child under age 21 aren’t subject to FUTA. Payments are subject to income tax withholding, regardless of the child’s age.

Payments for the services of a child are subject to income tax withholding as well as Social Security, Medicare and FUTA taxes if they work for:

  • A corporation, even if it’s controlled by the child’s parent, or
  • A partnership, even if the child’s parent is a partner, unless each partner is a parent of the child.

Parent employed by child. The wages for the services of a parent employed by their child are subject to income tax withholding and Social Security and Medicare taxes. They’re not subject to FUTA tax.

Employees complete Form W-4 so that their employer can withhold the correct federal income tax from their pay. The IRS encourages everyone to use the Tax Withholding Estimator to help them make sure they have the right amount of tax withheld from their paycheck. The estimator automatically links to Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, which they can then fill out and submit to their employer.

More information:

What #teachers should know about deducting #out-of-pocket #classroom #expenses

Now that fall is here and school has started, many teachers are dipping into their own pockets to buy classroom supplies. Doing this throughout the year can add up fast. Fortunately, eligible educators may be able to defray qualified expenses they paid in 2019 when they file their tax return in 2020.

Educators who work in schools may qualify to deduct up to $250 of unreimbursed expenses. That amount goes up to $500 if two qualified educators are married and file a joint return. However, neither spouse can deduct more than $250 of his or her qualified expenses when they file.

Taxpayers qualify for this deduction if they:

  • Teach any grade from kindergarten through twelfth grade. 
  • Are a teacher, instructor, counselor, principal or aide.
  • Work at least 900 hours during the school year.
  • Work in a school that provides elementary or secondary education.

Qualified expenses include:

  • Professional development courses.
  • Books.
  • Supplies.
  • Computer equipment including related software and services.
  • Supplementary materials.
  • Athletic supplies only for health and physical education.

Eligible taxpayers can claim this deduction when they file their taxes. The IRS encourages teachers to consider using tax software to help guide them through the process of claiming the deduction.

Many teachers may qualify to use online software for free with IRS Free File.


More information:
Topic No. 458 Educator Expense Deduction

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#IRS grants relief for U.S. persons who own #stock in certain #foreign #corporations

WASHINGTON — The Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service today issued Revenue Procedure 2019-40 and proposed regulations that provides relief to certain U.S. persons that own stock in certain foreign corporations.

The Revenue Procedure limits the inquiries required by U.S. persons to determine whether certain foreign corporations are controlled foreign corporations (“CFCs”). The Revenue Procedure also allows certain unrelated minority U.S. shareholders to rely on specified financial statement information to calculate their subpart F and GILTI inclusions and satisfy reporting requirements with respect to certain CFCs if more detailed tax information is not available. It also provides penalty relief to taxpayers in the specified circumstances. 

Finally, the Revenue Procedure announces that the IRS intends to amend the instructions for Form 5471 to reduce the amount of information that certain unrelated minority U.S. shareholders of the CFC are required to provide. It will also limit the filing requirements of U.S. shareholders who only constructively own stock of the CFC solely due to downward attribution from another person.

The proposed regulations provide additional relief to taxpayers affected by the repeal of section 958(b)(4). These regulations also propose modifications to existing regulations that are intended to ensure, in certain appropriate circumstances, that the operation of certain rules is consistent with their application before the repeal of section 958(b)(4). 

The repeal of section 958(b)(4) was part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. For more information about this and other TCJA provisions, visit IRS.gov/taxreform.

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IRS Video Portal features #tax info for #small_ businesses and #employers

Small business owners and others with tax questions can check out the IRS Video Portal to get more information on a wide range of topics. Taxpayers can visit the site to find videos and recorded webinars on topics such as:

Starting a business

Business income

Employers

Filing and paying taxes

The IRS also posts videos on the portal for individualstax professionalsgovernments, and charities and non-profits. There’s also a playlist with videos in Spanish.

Share this tip on social media — #IRSTaxTip: IRS Video Portal features tax info for small businesses and employers. https://go.usa.gov/xVa6z

Redesigned #Charities and #Nonprofits landing and associated webpages launched

Various Charities and Nonprofits webpages have been redesigned to improve organization, design and navigation using data analytics and user testing.

Charitable hospitals under the Affordable Care Act – Section 501(r)

The IRS updated webpages detailing four additional requirements under Internal Revenue Code Section 501(r) that must be met by charitable hospitals tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3). Watch this Overview of Requirements for Charitable Hospitals under Section 501(r) presentation.

TE/GE Issue Snapshots provide guidance to IRS employees working hospital cases:

New IRS Tax Withholding Estimator Tell your employees about the new IRS Tax Withholding Estimator. The new taxpayer-friendly tool on IRS.gov helps workers tailor the amount of income tax their employer should withhold from their paychecks and avoid unexpected results at tax time. The Estimator allows filers to target a tax due amount close to zero or a refund around $500.

A Charity’s Treatment of Volunteers Can Affect Tax Responsibilities

If your organization has employees or volunteers, it may have tax responsibilities. The Employment Issues course explains how charities classify employees, how to report employee wages, the rules regarding gifts to volunteers and filing requirements. Organizational leadership and volunteers should attend the Tax-Exempt Organization Workshop for important information on the benefits, limitations and expectations of tax-exempt organizations.

#Calendar Year Projections of Information and #Withholding Documents for the #United_States and #IRS Campuses (#Publication 6961) #Update


The 2019 Calendar Year Projections of Information and Withholding Documents for the United States and IRS Campuses (Publication 6961) is now available on SOI’s Tax Stats Web page. The publication presents multi-year projections (Calendar Years 2019–2027) of the number of information and withholding documents to be filed with the IRS by processing categories important to IRS planning operations, including form type and filing medium. Selected forecasts of paper returns are also shown by IRS processing campus locations.

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For more information on Federal Taxes please visit IRS.gov.

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